Copyright Plagiarism

Creative Commons

attribute 
For (larger) print, you could point readers to a single online page containing all the licensing information. This license file could also be made visible in your company’s site. So while the attribution is not strictly in the product, it’s mentioned somewhere accessible.

Digital Attribution
Websites – Include the attribution either on the page where the symbol is displayed, or in About or Credits pages.
Video – Include the attribution either on the page where the symbol is displayed, or in About or Credits pages.
Apps – Include the attribution either on the page where the symbol is displayed, or in About or Credits pages.
Print Atribution
Magazines – The attribution should be displayed either in the same article as the symbol, with the colophon, or at the back of the magazine.
Books – The attribution should be displayed either on the same page as the symbol, with the colophon, in the bibliography or Credits section.
Posters – The attribution should be displayed either on the same page as the symbol, with the colophon, in the bibliography or Credits section.

For a business card, my recommendation would be
Use a URL-shortening service to create a short url for the webpage that is hosting the original graphic with full attribution.
Use small print on the card to give the short url with the credit.
Example:
Sample business card with fine-print attribution link
If you have room, you might want to include the creator’s name as well as the link. You also might want to include the creative commons logo or CC-BY shorthand. It only adds a few characters and checks off another requirement of the licence.
More verbose example:
Sample business card with more complete fine-print attribution

Source:
https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/27498/how-to-attribute-give-credit-to-creative-commons-copyleft-public-domain-content
The Licenses

Attribution
CC BY

This license lets others distribute, remix, adapt, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
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Attribution-ShareAlike
CC BY-SA

This license lets others remix, adapt, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.
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Attribution-NoDerivs
CC BY-ND

This license lets others reuse the work for any purpose, including commercially; however, it cannot be shared with others in adapted form, and credit must be provided to you.
View License Deed | View Legal Code

Attribution-NonCommercial
CC BY-NC

This license lets others remix, adapt, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.
View License Deed | View Legal Code

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, adapt, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.
View License Deed | View Legal Code

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.
View License Deed | View Legal Code
We also provide tools that work in the “all rights granted” space of the public domain. Our CC0 tool allows licensors to waive all rights and place a work in the public domain, and our Public Domain Mark allows any web user to “mark” a work as being in the public domain.

Source: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

Briefly…
Attribution iconAttribution means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work – and derivative works based upon it – but only if they give you credit.
Noncommercial iconNoncommercial means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work – and derivative works based upon it – but for noncommercial purposes only.
No Derivative Works iconNo Derivative Works means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.
Share Alike iconShare Alike means:
You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.
CC0 iconPublic Domain Dedication (CC0) means:
You, the copyright holder, waive your interest in your work and place the work as completely as possible in the public domain so others may freely exploit and use the work without restriction under copyright or database law.
Public Domain Work iconPublic Domain Work means:
Works, or aspects of copyrighted works, which copyright law does not protect. Typically, works become part of the public domain because their term of protection under copyright law expired, the owner failed to follow certain required formalities, or the works are not eligible for copyright protection.

Source: https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/
In order to meet the varying needs of different publishing strategies, CC provides a set of six licences and two public domain tools. Each licence contains one or more of four basic elements (the “licence features”) which are illustrated by abbreviations and pictograms.[1]
“BY” stands for attribution (the obligation to credit the author and other parties designated for attribution); “NC” stands for NonCommercial (commercial use is excluded from the licence grant); “ND” means NoDerivatives (only verbatim copies of the work can be shared) and “SA” represents ShareAlike (i.e. the work can be modified and modified versions can be published but only under the original or a compatible licence).
These four features form the basis of a fixed set of six CC licences

Source: https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Open_Content_-_A_Practical_Guide_to_Using_Creative_Commons_Licences/The_Creative_Commons_licencing_scheme
Here is an example of a proper Figure citation:
Figure 1.
Lemur in the wild

Note. From Black and white Ruffled Lemur [Photograph], by M. Appel, 2016, (https://flic.kr/p/E4p9hN).

Source: https://libguides.scf.edu/c.php?g=847004&p=6077102
Examples on different citation types for the same material e.g. APA and MLA for YouTube
Source: https://www.mendeley.com/guides/web-citation-guide/
royalty payment is a payment made by one party to another that owns a particular asset, for the right to ongoing use of that asset. 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royalty_payment
Royalty-free (RF) material subject to copyright or other intellectual property rights may be used without the need to pay royalties or license fees for each use, per each copy or volume sold or some time period of use or sales.
i.e. pay for use just once, use can be done for unlimited times.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royalty-free